Brandon Lim

Wanting more out of his career as a graphic designer, Brandon Lim, SIM-RMIT University alumnus, set his sights on creating something of his own. He founded FUSSY and Project Shop - two platforms which have paved the way for the local creative community to grow and thrive.
News & Events News & Events News & Events Highlights Wanting more out of his career as a graphic designer, Brandon Lim, SIM-RMIT University alumnus, set his sights on creating something of his own. He founded FUSSY and Project Shop - two platforms which have paved the way for the local creative community to grow and thrive. Why did you decide to pursue the SIM-RMIT University Bachelor of Design (Communication Design) programme? I knew I wanted to go into a different area of design while pursuing the Diploma in Interior Architecture and Design programme in Temasek Polytechnic. At that time, I was already buying magazines because I was drawn to the way the layout, images and content come together. It struck me that I had an interest in this. I came across JUICE, a magazine which encompassed everything I liked from indie music to the latest gadgets and hang out places, and knew I wanted to work for them as a graphic designer. I applied for the Communication Design programme afterwards and was thrilled when I got accepted. You have started FUSSY & Project Shop. What sparked your interest in running your own business? Two years into working for other companies, I realised that while my peers were staying in their respective jobs for at least a year, I couldn’t seem to stay in one for more than 10 months. I wanted something to call my own, something I’d go to great lengths for instead of merely completing my responsibilities and waiting to leave on the dot. So I started FUSSY, a platform to share about design and global independent products that are not sold locally. It grew to feature works by local creatives as a way of recognition and motivation for them to carry on their craft while pushing their creative boundaries at the same time. I felt that more can be done for our local creative community and even the communities in South East Asia down the road. With this aim, we rolled out Project Shop where creatives can earn an income from projects as they hone their craft. How has the programme laid the groundwork for your path? As I work with various people for group assignments, it has made me more adaptable as a person. It has also helped me to understand and identify the different languages and tones of design - whether it is bold, friendly or quirky. This knowledge has guided me in my work; not just in the conceptualisation process but also in helping clients to understand what they’re looking out for in their projects. What are your hopes for Singapore’s creative scene? The creative scene is a tough push especially in Singapore’s economy but I hope that every creative will strive to pursue their craft full-time. Be it freelance, learn on the job or continue developing themselves to achieve full mastery of their craft. There are many creatives who have taken that leap of faith and get to where they’re now only because they dived fully into it. Who is your hero and why? I don’t really have one but there are people whom I admire for their life philosophy. One of them is Simon Sinek who popularises the concept of why and figuring out the purpose for what you do. I also find Gary Vaynerchuck insightful because of his up-to-date marketing skills and tips. #SIM-RMITGraduate #GlobalHero Click here to learn more about the programmes awarded by RMIT University. Posted online, 27 Feb 2020