Tan Si Min

Apart from the mind-intriguing engagements I had with my professors during lectures and tutorials, I also had insightful exchanges with fellow students (on her immersion at LSE).
Discover SIM GE It wasn’t just books, lectures and exams for University of London graduates Tan Si Min and Stephanie Shayne Ora. While students with the Singapore Institute of Management’s UOL academic programmes, they took the opportunity to go on overseas immersion study programmes, work as interns abroad and participate in community work. “Over the course of the three years I have spent at SIM campus, I had been engaged in activities such as entrepreneurial, charity and sporting events, as well as three Education Abroad programmes,” says Si Min, 23 (BSc in Economics & Management). Insightful exchanges at LSE She attended six weeks of classes at the London School of Economics (picture above). “Apart from the mind-intriguing engagements I had with my professors during lectures and tutorials, I also had insightful exchanges with fellow students.” Away from home allowed Si Min to discover within herself a new sense of independence and to take full responsibilities for her own actions. Si Min also participated in SIM’s six-week Summer Institute in 2011. Here, students examine concepts related to the somewhat grandiose theme “Economic Competitiveness, Innovation and Creative Cultures”. The programme was conducted by lecturers from abroad. The accumulation of such diverse and intellectually stimulating experiences has helped shaped the perspectives that she has today, says Si Min. And she strongly believes students must possess a strong conviction to want to learn if they are to thrive in any educational setting. Enrolling in these programmes is currently voluntary. But should it be made compulsory to all university students? Well, according to Si Min, in order to truly benefit, the student must go in with a willing heart and a hungry mind. Understanding guanxi Si Min also worked for three months as an intern at the Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City in Guangzhou, China. While there, she experienced firsthand the unique China style of social networking known as guanxi. She felt troubled by this practice but notes that it remains “one of the most effective and prevalent antidotes in ensuring or facilitating effective business negotiations in the Chinese corporate culture, and it is certainly a skill that one has to be attuned to, in business engagements with the Chinese”. See also separate story on Stephanie Ora. --- Posted, November 2012